National Geographic, 125 Years. The Great Adventure
125 Years in the World and 15 in Italy
28 September 2013 - 2 March 2014

EXTENDED UNTIL JULY 13th 2014

Palazzo delle Esposizioni, via Nazionale , Roma


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When a group of 33 men met at the Cosmos Club in Washington DC on January 13, 1888, to discuss how to increase and spread geographical knowledge, no one thought then that the National Geographic Society would become one of the most famous scientific and educational organizations in the world.
Today, 125 years after the Society’s foundation, a major photographic exhibition "The Great Adventure" is honoring the history of the National Geographic brand, which in recent years has firmly established itself in many other countries throughout the world. In fact, the show is being staged to celebrate National Geographic Italia’s 15th birthday as well as the Society’s 125th anniversary.

National Geographic, 125 anni. La Grande Avventura

VISITING HOURS
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday: 10:00 am - 8:00 pm
Friday, Saturday: 10:00 am - 10:30 pm
Sunday: 10:00 am - 8:00 pm

Last admission one hour before closing time

PRICES
Full price € 12,00 + € 2.00 agency fees
Reduced price € 9,50 + € 2.00 agency fees
Schools € 4,00 + € 1.00 agency fees each student Tuesday to Friday (Holydays excluded)
The ticket allows you to visit all the exhibitions at Palazzo delle Esposizioni

Admission to exhibitions at the Scuderie del Quirinale and at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni for students, researchers and undergraduates registered with public or private universities in Rome costs € 4.00 on Fridays and Saturdays, after 7.00 pm until the box office closes
First Wednesday of the month: thanks to Lottomatica free entry for under 30 on the first Wednesday of the month from 2:00pm to 7:00pm. The entrance is free for single visitors only. It is not available for groups.

How to reach us

On the bus
16-170-36-360-37-38-40-60-61-62-64-70-H

On the underground

metro A (get off at Piazza della Repubblica)
metro B (get off at Cavour)

From the train station (Stazione Termini)

From Piazza dei Cinquecento (in front of station)
take bus 40 (towards Piazza Pia/Castel S. Angelo)
2 stops and get off at Nazionale/Quirinale;
walk 100 meters to the Scuderie del Quirinale

From Fiumicino airport (Leonardo da Vinci)

Take the train to Termini (it leaves every 30 minutes)
then follow directions above

Reservation :

COOP. IL SOGNO
Viale R.Margherita, 192 00198 - Rome (Italy)
Ph. +39/0685301758 Fax +39/0685301756
Email: service@romeguide.it

When a group of 33 men met at the Cosmos Club in Washington DC on January 13, 1888, to discuss how to increase and spread geographical knowledge, no one thought then that the National Geographic Society would become one of the most famous scientific and educational organizations in the world.

Today, 125 years after the Society’s foundation, a major photographic exhibition "The Great Adventure" is honoring the history of the National Geographic brand, which in recent years has firmly established itself in many other countries throughout the world. In fact, the show is being staged to celebrate National Geographic Italia’s 15th birthday as well as the Society’s 125th anniversary.

"The Great Adventure" traces the stages of a long, fascinating, extraordinary, indeed unique, journey between adventure and legendary personalities; laboratory research and expeditions to the most remote parts of the planet; the cultures of great peoples and those of unknown tribes; the beauty of animal life and that of plants; a commitment to knowledge and to saving Mother Earth. Within the unmistakable yellow frame of the magazine, epic stories have been recounted: the legendary discovery of the lost city of Machu Picchu; Robert Peary’s adventurous expedition to the North Pole; Jane Goodall’s unforgettable encounters with chimpanzees, and Jacques Cousteau’s and James Cameron’s remarkable underwater feats.

The exhibition documents the landmark moments in the Society’s history with images captured by NG’s greatest photographers. From the first photos that appeared in the magazine to the present, through the evolution of communication and technologies which, thanks to the Internet and television, guarantee a following of hundreds of millions worldwide, including 30 million readers of the magazine and over one million on-line readers and surfers in Italy.

While communication has changed, the Society has not changed its goal and its mission: to explore the planet and to make people more aware of their responsibility toward it. The show will give everyone the possibility of becoming familiar with and understanding, firsthand, the extraordinary engagement and professionalism of the National Geographic Society, a community of photographers, journalists, office staff, technicians, researchers and writers, whose watchword is passion. Indeed, the Society’s 125 years and the Italian magazine’s 15 years make for a thrilling story that will even astonish the most distracted visitor!

"Building bridges spanning millennia, continents and civilizations, and reaching human beings who might seem to be inevitably cut off from us because of their different languages, forms of writing, laws, customs and beliefs, only to discover that they are in fact very similar to us, almost like brothers - this is utmost pleasure." These words by  writer, photographer, pilgrim-traveller and ethnologist Fosco Maraini approximate my idea of National Geographic more than anything else. For while it is true that the Society has offered millions of people the chance to discover the world in its vastness, I believe that the most significant contribution it has made concerns the opportunity to acquire direct knowledge of all the living creatures of the Earth - starting from its peoples. Through this magazine - one of a kind, actually encompassing a host of different magazines within itself - I have made contact with women, children and elderly people from a range of different places.

I have grown acquainted with histories, cultures and ways of living - and surviving - by reading wonderful reports and gazing at extraordinary photographs.

Many people, if not most, consider NG a photography magazine. It certainly is - but only in part. Every month it also publishes top-notch articles by scholars, researchers and journalists. These have taught me about a range of different natural environments and the life of animals, their specific habitats, their beauty and the difficulties they face - as many are faced with extinction. Through gripping pages I have come to enjoy an ongoing narrative about our planet, which  represents the most captivating, most profound side  of a periodical that in the age of real-time technological information is still capable of moving and amazing its readers, while stirring their emotions.

With "La Grande Avventura" we are seeking to convey the essence of National Geographic to the highest possible number of people. The exhibition - organized, as always, with the help of the hard-working and creative editorial staff of the magazine - differs from the five previous ones, as it does not consist only of images: this is a historical as well as a photographic exhibition, enabling visitors to embark on a journey which has touched all continents after it began 125 years ago in Washington. By following a clear and simple itinerary  (125 photos, exhibit panels, covers from the magazine, television screens, touch-screens), visitors will soon discover why we speak of a "great adventure" with reference to NG. Alongside this is a shorter but nonetheless significant adventure: the fifteen years of the Italian edition of the magazine. What you have in your hands, then, is not so much a catalogue as a history book: through pictures and words it brings into focus crucial moments, important landmarks, and the notable faces of human or animal protagonists. Credit for the work undertaken, however, also goes to the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome, which for the sixth time has opened up its charming rooms for a National Geographic cultural event.

There is one further message the exhibition aims to convey: that we are the most intelligent beings on our planet, but not the best. We must be more respectful towards other creatures, since Mother Earth's destiny lies primarily in our hands. We cannot ignore, or feign to ignore, that we are not her masters. Let us bear in mind that the resources we have at our disposal are not inexhaustible. If after the exhibition you will gaze at all living species with different - more empathic and understanding - eyes, it will have accomplished its mission. It will mean that the hope of having a better world is still alive.

Reservation :

COOP. IL SOGNO
Viale R.Margherita, 192 00198 - Rome (Italy)
Ph. +39/0685301758 Fax +39/0685301756
Email: service@romeguide.it

National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
Hugo Van Lawick, Tanzania, 1964
With one touch of nature, Jane Goodall and newborn Flint made the whole world kin.
Eliza Scidmore, Japan, 1900 ca.
Eliza Scidmore provides hand-tinted photographs of Japan for Geographic, which had begun publishing similar "color" pictures two years earlier.
W. Robert Moore, Siam, 1930s ca.
Dancers reenact incidents in the life of Phra Ruang outside a temple.
Joseph Rock, Choni, Tibet 1926
Before the sixth day of the sixth moon the monks used 15-foot trumpets to summon lamas to prepare for the Cham- ngyon-wa, or Old Dance.
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
Hiram Bingham, Perù | 1912 Pochi luoghi nel mondo erano più spettacolari del Machu Picchu, soprattutto dopo che un esercito di indigeni armati di machete aveva eliminato la vegetazione che ostruiva la vista al fotografo.
Fotografo sconosciuto. Località ignota del Witwatersrand, nella Repubblica del Sudafrica, Fine XIX secolo. L’immagine di questa sposa zulu, apparsa sul numero di novembre del 1896, fu la prima di una lunga serie di foto di donne a seno nudo pubblicate su National Geographic.
Carl E. Akeley, Kenya | 1910 Circa Carl Akeley riuscì a cogliere questo primo piano straordinariamente dettagliato di una zebra di Burchell che riposava nelle pianure di Athi.
Thomas J Abercrombie, Puerto Rico | 1960 Jacques-Yves Cousteau svela Denise, la rivoluzionaria capsula a immersione costruita con il sostegno della Society.
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
Robert Goodman, Mar Rosso | 1963 I sommozzatori del progetto Conshelf II di Jacques Cousteau difendono dai predatori affamati i campioni che hanno raccolto nella loro “casa” sottomarina.
William Albert Allard, Pennsylvania | 1965 Un giovane amish con un cappello di paglia e le bretelle accarezza un porcellino d’India.
Robert E. Peary, Canada | 1909 Probabilmente Robert E. Peary e il suo assistente non raggiunsero il Polo Nord nel 1909, ma di certo si avvicinarono come nessun altro prima.
Volkmar Wentzel, India | 1947 Seduti su un balcone affacciato sulla valle del Kashmir alcuni tessitori con il turbante fumano insieme una pipa ad acqua.
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
National Geographic in mostra al Palazzo delle Esposizioni
Paul Nicklen, Canada | 2011 Addentratosi nella verdeggiante foresta pluviale della regione costiera della Columbia Britannica, Paul Nicklen ha scattato questa bella e rara immagine di un orso kermode, detto anche orso spirito, quasi completamente bianco.
Emory Kristof, Atlantico del Nord | 1991 La prua del R.M.S. Titanic si staglia nel buio degli abissi illuminata dal sommergibile russo Mir I e fotografata da Emory Kristof.
Michael Nichols, Parco nazionale del Semien, Etiopia | 2002 Il babbuino Gelada, che di solito si accontenta di mangiare l’erba delle praterie, ha comunque due canini decisamente pronunciati.
Mali | 1997 Coperta da un velo di sabbia proveniente dal letto asciutto di un lago, una famiglia fa un sonnellino in pieno pomeriggio.